Pop Culture Clash
from my screen to yours'
mwstfl:

somewhereontheiceplanet:

Rebel Rebel by Leka Im

IMPORTANT.

mwstfl:

somewhereontheiceplanet:

Rebel Rebel by Leka Im

IMPORTANT.

1 week ago with 178 notes — via mwstfl, © somewhereontheiceplanet


re-sile:

Hamlet the sore winner.

1 month ago with 927 notes — via cloysterbell, © re-sile




sunnydale high, class of 1999

1 month ago with 4,845 notes — via horrorfetish, © bitcaoftheyear


inothernews:

millionmovieproject:

No cut-aways, one take.
Crew members threatened to quit and begged him not to do it.
The cameraman looked away while rolling.
A six ton prop.
It brushes his arm as it comes down.
And he doesn’t even flinch.

Buster fucking Keaton, everyone.

inothernews:

millionmovieproject:

No cut-aways, one take.

Crew members threatened to quit and begged him not to do it.

The cameraman looked away while rolling.

A six ton prop.

It brushes his arm as it comes down.

And he doesn’t even flinch.

Buster fucking Keaton, everyone.

3 months ago with 88,778 notes — via future-mortician, © questcequecestqueca


Thoughts on ‘Harold and Maude’…

Harold & Maude, a 1971 film directed by Hal Ashby, is initially a film obsessed with death, the banality of it, the hilarity in despair and the inherent pain in the lack of courage it takes to live- at least to a young man named Harold (Bud Cort). Harold feels desperate in his situation, which is that of the juvenile, rich, and unbearably bored and lonely. He stages elaborate suicides for chiefly his mother’s benefit but never goes through with committing them; actually killing himself would be a tremendously difficult act despite his obsession with mortality. And essentially, he probably doesn’t want to die, but to show others how little he regards his life and how desperate he feels despite his numb exterior. It is in this we can see what is truly at the character’s core.

            Harold, as the film, initially seems fanatical about death and wanting to be away from the pressures and frustrations that life has to offer him through it, but in fact the film celebrates life and finding hope even in the darkest situations- and Harold turns out to be a character that is much more interested in living than one would originally believe. Through the character of Maude (played by Ruth Gordon), Harold and the audience begin to look at life a different way, and appreciate the small things that many people learn to take for granted because they seem so intrinsically mundane. Flowers, smells, and the sound of a ukulele all seem like a lot more when you perceive that you have things to live for, as we see through Harold slowly discovering his joie de vivre. Maude is in her seventy-ninth year when Harold meets her at one of his routine funeral crashings, and he becomes charmed by her optimistic spirit almost immediately. She is what he has been waiting for, the thing that his mother has been trying to push onto him with constant dates with clueless young women. Harold falls in love with Maude, but what he really is falling in love with is life, for the first time in likely a long time, or ever. Maude tells him, “A lot of people enjoy being dead. But they’re not dead, really. They’re just backing away from life.” Harold, in his own “deaths”, has been backing away from his own more and more as his mother and other characters try to push him further into it. It takes quite an old woman who has seen unimaginable horrors- we see a flash of a concentration camp tattoo- to show him the splendor of being alive, and the beauty of falling in love. Through her conquering of her past horrors, Harold can realize that his present situation is a lot more than he gives it credit for, and in that realization take the truest and biggest leap of his life: revealing his love of Maude to her, as well as everyone else, despite her age and their judgment. Her courage in turn gives him courage. This motif is repeated once again at the end of the film, when Maude on her eightieth birthday has decided to let go of life and move on to the unknown, as she had hinted at in the beginning of the film. Harold insists that he “can’t live without [her]” but, as he protests he loves her and begs her to live, she implores him to “go…love some more.” And instead of falling into complete despair and perhaps taking his life once and for all, we see that that is what he likely intends to do, in her honor.

            Harold & Maude is imperfect. It wanders at times and meanders quite a bit, and sometimes seems to delight in its quirkiness at a very self-conscious level, as in a long, though subtly funny scene where Maude “rescues” a tree from dying on a city sidewalk. Sometimes it gets easier to take the imperfections in films in stride because of the small perfections they grant us, and the different points of view they show us. Harold & Maude is that kind of film. It may not be for everyone, and there likely will be people as viscerally upset as Harold’s family and acquaintances were when he insists that he’s in love with a woman who is about to hit eighty. Love can be “gross”, and feelings can be weird, and nothing that overwhelms you as much as adoration or joie de vivre can be readily explained. There is a celebration of the strangeness of life and the presence of death in it in this film, and the fact that they don’t always have to be attached, because you do have a choice- not exactly whether or not to kill yourself, but whether or not you’ll let yourself live. Harold & Maude makes you consider life, and in a positive way, no matter if you like the film or not. That’s what makes it important.

3 months ago with 2 notes


galacticaps:

Good. Because a man who doesn’t spend time with his family can never be a real man. The Godfather (1972)

5 months ago with 3,338 notes — via bitchybillionaire, © cinemaspam


rosiesdoctor:

four houses, four fanmixes: {listen all together}

the brave: {listen}

pompeii - bastille | little lion man - mumford and sons | the phoenix - fall out boy | everybody loves me - onerepublic | spark - fitz and the tantrums | mr. brightside - the killers | king and lionheart - of monsters and men | kiss with a fist - florence and the machine

the wise: {listen}

drops of jupiter - train | young volcanoes - fall out boy | human - the killers | fast car - tracy chapman | undercover martyn - two door cinema club | first day of my life - bright eyes | thoughts of flight - edmund | killer queen - queen

the loyal: {listen}

stutter - marianas trench | australia - the shins | come on eileen - dexy’s midnight runners | skipping stone - transit | you and i - ingrid michaelson | stranger - chris august | little wonders - rob thomas | come on get higher - matt nathanson | ho hey - the lumineers

the cunning: {listen}

bad blood - bastille | us - regina spektor | the boys are too refined - the hush sound | ain’t no rest for the wicked - cage the elephant | kill your heroes - awolnation | car radio - twenty one pilots | flaws - bastille | all these things i’ve done - the killers 

all cover edits by tumblr user azkbn!

5 months ago with 36,208 notes — via littlelionjaime, © alinovna


Song: Darlin'
Artist: The Beach Boys
Album: Wild Honey
1,303 plays

Don’t know if words can say
but darlin’, I’ll find a way
to let you know what you meant to me
guess it was meant to be
i hold you in my heart
as life’s most precious part

5 months ago with 220 notes — via bitchybillionaire, © radtracks


5 months ago with 492,609 notes — via realparanormal, © agreeing